Licensed Nutritionist, Does It Have Any Meaning In Wisconsin?

Licensed Nutritionist, Does It Have Any Meaning In Wisconsin?

Can a Nutritionist Get A License in Wisconsin?

First off, as of right now a nutritionist even with advanced education, cannot get a license in the State of Wisconsin.  Only registered dietitians can get a license to practice in Wisconsin. Currently, all surrounding states like Illinois, Minnesota, even Michigan offer pathways for a nutritionist to get a license however, it requires an advanced degree, internship, and passing of exam by a certification board.

So, if someone states that they are licensed nutritionist they are not unless they have completed the registered dietitian program along with their “nutrition” degree.

What are the Regulations for Nutrition Consulting?

Currently, the field of nutrition consulting is not highly regulated in some states; Wisconsin is one of them.  In these states, there are many different educational pathways that a person can follow.

Some as simple as learning from a script when signing up with a company that sells nutritional products, like Usana or Arbonne.  Or, attending a “seminar” and now they are “certified” nutritionists basically interested in selling their products to you.  They then offer free nutritional consulting.  Obviously, they are earning their money when they sell you products that are usually overpriced.

What Education Should You Look For Before Hiring a Nutritionist?

On the other hand, they are many different educational institutions offering everything from 3 months to 1-year education and now you can consult.  And, then there Health Coaches – which does not require any or very little educational background in actual nutritional science.

Unless they have a degree in science like nutrition, biochemistry or human biochemistry with their coaching certificate, I would be very wary taking nutritional advice from them – coaching you to better health is one thing but advising on health conditions is another.

The Dietetic Law

Due to this lack of regulation and to protect the consumers, some states have instituted what is referred to as the “dietetic law” where only a registered dietitian can practice nutrition consulting.  Not even a chiropractor or naturopathic can do nutritional consulting.

Some states like Illinois and Michigan have amended this law allowing people with advanced education (Masters) and completed an internship to get a license and practice nutritional consulting.  The titles that are currently eligible for this are Certified Clinical Nutritionist and Certified Nutrition Specialist.  So you can see where all of the letters are coming from; CCN, CNS, RD, and so on.

This is just the tip of the “iceberg” – there are now certifications in diabetic care, functional nutrition – all mean more letters.  Always ask about the letters after their name; what do they mean?  What is their educational background?  Look at what organizations that they are members of as professional organizations only allow people with the right credentials to join.

When hiring a nutritionist, it all depends on what you are looking for – general nutrition advice or specific nutritional advice regarding a condition or concerns over developmental nutrition (children, aging adults, etc.).  Most basic nutritional education does not cover developmental nutrition, proper use of supplements, nutrient interaction with medications, and advanced biochemistry in human nutrition.

Practice “Buyer Beware” in the State of Wisconsin

In states with “in title only” legislation like Wisconsin – it is definitely buyer beware.  And, it all depends on what you looking for; basic nutrition and lifestyle consulting or something more personalized and not just the latest diet fad, like gluten-free, pH diets, or cleansing. 

It is pretty much a buyer “beware” environment.  Be careful here as they often offer advice that is based on incorrect information, offer only the latest nutrition marketing hype, and/or is not evidence-based.  You get what you pay for.

Why Hire a Functional Nutritionist?

A functional nutritionist has advanced education that has been approved by the Institute of Functional Medicine.  Their approach is a whole-body approach looking for the underlying cause.  They have been trained to evaluate advanced lab work as well as integrative lab testing like stool and organic acid testing.  And, some have been trained in nutrigenomics.

Because of the complexity of nutritional biochemistry and nutrigenomics, most functional nutritionists will specialize in an area like autoimmune skin conditions, breast cancer, digestive disorders, or metabolic health.  It takes years of training to understand how to interpret these tests and bring together a healing program for you.

If you are looking for general advice on how to lose weight or just how to clean up your diet, you might be better off working with a qualified health coach who is trained on basic nutrition. 

On the other hand, if you are struggling with psoriasis, IBS, or food intolerances, you should consider working with a functional nutritionist.  Expect to pay $240.00 or more for your first intake consult especially if they are incorporating the Living Matrix by the Institute of Functional Medicine.

 

Best Probiotics for Histamine Intolerance

Best Probiotics for Histamine Intolerance

What is Histamine Intolerance?

Histamine intolerance can lead to many symptoms but the most common are allergic-type reactions like stuffy nose, watery eyes, and sinus headaches.  We often reach for the anti-histamines to reduce the symptoms when we should be checking out what is in our pantry.

The body produces histamine for many reasons with the most important being defending the body against foreign invaders playing a major role in our immune system.   It is also found in food with fermented foods and leftover meats having some of the highest amounts.

Because our body produces it and it is in our food, our bodies have ways to make sure that histamine stays at healthy levels.  When histamine levels become too high, it can lead to allergic-type reactions.  But not for all of us.

For some of us, myself included, symptoms may vary resulting in migraines, headaches, skin conditions, and even insomnia.  Histamine intolerance is where our bodies are not able to manage healthy levels of histamine resulting in a myriad of symptoms.

Functional Nutrition Rash Histamine Intolerance

Symptoms of Histamine Intolerance

Histamine plays many roles in our body including regulating stomach acid.  It is also an “excitatory neurotransmitter”, brain signaling chemical.  Therefore, it plays a role in brain function and our mental health.

Because histamine plays so many different roles in our bodies, symptoms of histamine intolerance can vary from one person to the next.  This is one of the reasons it is so difficult to determine if you have this food intolerance.  We reach for the antihistamines, pain medications, or more instead of looking at our diet.

Whereas this food intolerance can be identified and resolved, it is difficult to manage as almost foods contain some level of histamine.  There is no such thing as a histamine free diet.

Symptoms of Histamine Intolerance:

  • Itching Skin, Eyes, Ears, and Nose
  • Hives, Skin rashes, Eczema
  • Autoimmune Flares – Psoriasis
  • Low Blood Pressure
  • Increased pulse rate
  • Anxiety, Panic Attacks
  • Headaches – Migraines, Cluster
  • Chest Pain
  • Fatigue, Confusion & Irritability
  • Heartburn, GERD
  • Bloody Noses
  • Sweaty Feet
  • Menstrual Irregularities including PMS

Causes of Histamine Intolerance

As with most food intolerances, it is a lack of an enzyme that leads to intolerance.  An excellent example of this is lactose intolerance with dairy foods.  Lactose intolerance is where we lack enough of the enzyme, lactase, to properly digest the sugars in dairy products.

With histamine, the enzyme known as diamine oxidase (DAO) produced in our gut, works a little differently than the enzyme, lactase.  This enzyme actually blocks the absorption of histamine from the foods that we consume. Thereby reducing and managing histamine levels.

On the other hand, we produce another enzyme known as histamine-N-methyltransferase, (HNMT).  This enzyme actually breaks down histamine thereby reducing levels.  Once levels get too high, HNMT, starts breaking down histamine to a manageable level.

heal the gut woman

What Could Go Wrong with these Two Enzymes?  

The enzyme DAO is produced by the bacteria in the gut as well as our body produces it.  One of the major causes of histamine intolerance is dysbiosis and a condition known as “leaky gut”.

Dysbiosis is a condition where our gut bacteria become imbalanced and, in most cases, we have an infection of bad bacteria.  This leads to a reduction of DAO and we over absorb histamine from our food leading to histamine intolerance.

With HNMT, this enzyme depends on a process known as methylation which produces a compound known as SAMe.  This process depends highly on certain nutrients like folate, vitamin B12, and B2.  If you are deficient in these nutrients or there a great demand for these nutrients, you could become histamine intolerant.

Some of the causes of deficiencies in folate, vitamin B12, and B2 are chronic stress and chronic hidden infections like dysbiosis.   So, you can see that the role of gut health plays a major role in whether you will become histamine intolerant or not.

Looking at the fact that HNMT, needs SAMe one would think that supplementing with SAMe would do the trick.  Unfortunately, like most dietary supplements, it depends on many other factors and nutrients to balance out nutrient deficiencies.

Supplementing with SAMe can lead to anxiety and insomnia, therefore, it is recommended and that you support methylation instead.  Instead, you can promote healthy methylation through consuming foods that are rich in folate like green leafy vegetables and foods rich in vitamin B12 (found mostly in animal products).

Functional Nutrition Heal Histamine Intolerance Wine Pizza

Can you resolve histamine intolerance?

With most food intolerances, you have to first identify if you have it and then it is a matter of managing your food intolerance.  This is for two reasons.

One depends on your genetic makeup as there many different genomic variances that come into play with histamine intolerance.  The other depends on your gut health and being able to maintain a healthy gut and gut microbiota.

The first step to resolving histamine intolerance is to identify if you are histamine intolerance.  Doing a food/symptom journal is a great place to start.  By connecting what you eat to your symptoms you can begin to see if there a connection.

Due to the fact that food intolerances are dosage dependent, in other words, it depends on how much you eat not just what you eat.  You will have to do a food journal for at least 1 week or so.  This is how I found out I was histamine intolerant.

Foods High in Histamine

  • Processed, cured, fermented meat
  • Leftover meat, poultry, pork and fish
  • Fermented milk products like yogurt
  • Seafood: shellfish, fresh, frozen, smoked or canned
  • Fish especially tuna fish (canned)
  • Fermented foods – sauerkraut, kombucha, fermented soy products
  • Tomatoes
  • Artificial food colors and preservatives
  • Chocolate, cocoa and cola drinks
  • Alcoholic Beverages – wine and beer

Almost all foods contain some histamine.  This list does not include all foods high in histamine but includes the most commonly eaten foods high in histamine.

Unlike food allergies, where the response is immediate, food intolerances can take up to 2 days for symptoms to occur.  For me, it was the realization that every time I indulged with a glass of red wine and pizza, I would get a migraine.

All of these foods are high in histamine.  My migraines would usually start up around 3.00 am when histamine release is at its highest for most of us.

Once you have determined if you are histamine intolerant, then you have to try to determine the underlying root cause.  In most cases, healing the gut is key to resolving histamine intolerance.

Begin with my FREE Health Assessment to assess how healthy your gut is and how you can improve your gut health.

You may also have genomic variants that lead to poor enzyme functions like MTHFR, which can increase your need for folate and vitamin B12.  For me, I have the rarest variant in MTHFR as well as variants in both DAO and HMNT.  The key to truly managing your histamine intolerance is genomic testing and evaluation.

With my Optimize Health Genomic Package, you can finally get down to the underlying cause and manage your food intolerances.  Or, you can get started today with Nutrition Genome, reviewing key variants to your overall health, gut health, and potential food intolerances.

 

Are There Probiotic Strains That You Should Avoid?

Yes, definitely.  I learned the hard way on this one.  Trying to experiment with making my own yogurt, I purchased a culture to make my yogurt containing Lactobacillus bulgaricus.  Oops…

Lactobacillus bulgaricus can be found in many popular yogurt brands, i.e. Fage.  Always, read the labels on yogurt and other fermented products to see what strains that they are using.  Avoid products that do not properly list probiotics strains.

Probiotic strains that are histamine producers:

  • Lactobacillus bulgaricus
  • Lactobacillus casei
  • Lactobacillus reuteri
  • S. thermophilus*

These stains should be avoided.  Along with fermented products, be careful with probiotic supplements. Always read the label.  For instance, S.thermophilus is commonly used in broad-spectrum supplemental probiotics.

What Are the Best Probiotics for Histamine Intolerance?

Just like there are probiotic strains that promote histamine, there are strains that degrade histamine.  So along with DAO which blocks absorption, these strains degrade and breakdown histamine.  These are also commonly found in fermented foods and dietary supplements.

  • Bifidobacterium infantis
  • Bidobacterium longum
  • Lactobaccillus gasseri
  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus
  • Lactobacillus plantarum
  • Lactobacillus salivarius

Using probiotic supplementation is a great way to improve your gut microbiota and resolve histamine intolerance.  But don’t forget to add in the healthy foods that contain prebiotics to truly heal leaky gut and dysbiosis.

Some of the foods that high in healthy prebiotics like apples, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus and even barley are all high in prebiotics.  Root vegetables like beets and sweet potatoes provide the gut bacteria with the food that the good bacteria need to flourish.  If you having problems digesting these foods, you might need a digestion tune-up.  Check out my FREE Health Assessment to get started.

 

Functional Nutrition Approach to Healing Histamine Intolerance

To end the madness of elimination dieting and to enjoy wine and cheese again, start with my FREE Health Assessment.  Followed up my complimentary 15-minute consult, begins the journey of getting to the root cause of your food intolerance.

Histamine intolerance, like most intolerances, did not occur overnight.  Nor, were you born with it.  Over the years, gut health, hormonal imbalances, medications, poor diet, and chronic stress can take its toll on our gut.

That is why functional nutrition using a comprehensive health history and profile.  From there it might be recommended to conduct integrative testing like a stool or organic acid testing.

Genomic testing is highly recommended as it involves not just variants that can impact enzyme production, but variants that have an impact on your gut health.

In addition, some of these variants can have an impact not just on food intolerances but autoimmune conditions like psoriasis.  For me, genomic testing was a game-changer as I finally got down to the root cause of my histamine intolerance and autoimmune skin conditions.

 

  1. Histamine and histamine intolerance, Laura Maintz and Natalija, American Journal Clinical Nutrition, 2007;85:1185-96
  2. Headaches, Hives and Heartburn Could Histamine be the Cause, Chris Kresser
  3. Degradation of Histamine by Lactobacillus Plantarum Isolated From Miso Products, Kung, et al, PMID: 28885051
  4. Probiotic Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Downregulates FCER1 and HRH4 Expression in Human Mast Cells, Oksaharju, et al, PMID: 21390145
Could Your Allergies Be A Food Sensitivity or Intolerance?

Could Your Allergies Be A Food Sensitivity or Intolerance?

We often blame our sniffling, sneezing, and watery eyes on those spring flowers, budding trees, and of course, grasses.  But for some of us, we have these allergic reactions year-round – can’t blame that on spring flowers and the budding trees.

Maybe it is not an allergy to something in our environment but to something that we have eaten.  That skin rash or sneezing after we ate something could be a food allergy.  Or, it could a food intolerance.

So, if you are not getting a response from taking medications like an anti-histamine, your symptoms might from a food allergy or food intolerance.

But is there a difference between food allergies and food intolerances?

What is a Food Allergy?

Most food allergies are followed with an immediate response and involve skin rashes, swollen lips, and/or tongue and in some cases stuffy nose.  They are also not “dose-dependent”; in other words, you only need to eat a bite to get a reaction.

You will have a higher chance of having a food allergy if you have environmental allergies as there is cross-reaction with environmental allergens and certain foods.

So, you are allergic to ragweed, there is a high probability that you will be allergic to cucumbers.

How can you tell if you have a food allergy?  Well, the immediate reaction is the first clue.  Eat a bite of an apple, get swollen lips, there is a good chance you are allergic to apples.

You can be tested for food allergies using a skin prick test but it is very inaccurate.  Blood or serum tests for food allergies are also highly inaccurate.

If you are going to test for food allergies, make sure that the test is testing for what is referred to as the IgE response, not IgG response.  How do you know?  Check with the lab or the practitioner that you are working with.

Most of the inexpensive and common lab testing for food sensitivities only test for IgG response which is very inaccurate.  Testing for food sensitivities is completely different than testing for food allergies.  Testing for food sensitivities tests for reactions to the sugars in food while testing for food allergies tests for the proteins in food.

Do your homework when looking for lab testing for food allergies or food sensitivities.  My favorite lab for just food allergies is Dunwoody Labs.  Contact me to learn more about testing and how you can get tested for food allergies.

Are Food Sensitivities the Same as Food Allergies?

In a nutshell, no.  First, food sensitivities are dosage-dependent and secondly, the reaction is delayed.  So that omelet with 3 eggs may take until the evening to get a response.   Food sensitivity reactions are usually constipation, diarrhea, headaches, joint pain, and brain fog versus the runny nose or sniffles.

The most accurate food sensitivity testing is MRT from Oxford Labs.  Why?  Because they test multiple immune responses to 170 foods and chemicals.   The MRT test is one of the few lab tests that tests for chemicals; some of these chemicals relate to food intolerances like tyramine (think red wine).

Included with this lab test is a comprehensive elimination diet and how to overcome food sensitivities with the LEAP program which is part of my Resolve Food Sensitivities Program.

But What About Food Intolerances?

The most common food intolerance that causes allergic-like symptoms in some people is histamine intolerance.  Most food intolerances are caused by lack of the enzyme or poor gut health (poor microbiome) which supports the breakdown of common food chemicals like histamine and lactose from dairy products.

Histamine Rich Foods Fermented

Histamine is found the highest in fermented foods, preserved meats, cheese, canned fish, and alcoholic beverages.  For some people, they will react with sneezing and sniffling after they consume enough histamine rich foods.  Other common reactions are:

  • Headaches, Migraines
  • Brain Fog
  • Nausea
  • Bloody Noses
  • Sniffling, Sneezing, Watery Eyes
  • Insomnia
  • PMS
  • Blood Pressure – Low
  • GERD, Heartburn
  • Skin Rashes
  • Psoriasis, Eczema

Almost all food intolerances are related to genomics – nutrigenomics.  Certain gene variants will reduce the enzyme function that breakdown food chemicals like histamine, lactose, sulfur, and tyramine.

Food intolerance testing – it is very challenging to test for food intolerances and it is usually a trial and error process.  You can test for histamine intolerance though Dunwoody Labs but other food intolerances are difficult at best to test for.

Ever Notice that We Get Allergies as We Get Older?

Maybe it is really is histamine intolerance?  Ever notice those “allergies” get worse as we get older?  There might be a connection here.

As we get older, our digestion can become impaired.  For one, we produce less gastric acid as we get older which means we don’t absorb nutrients from our or breakdown food very well.

It doesn’t help that we also start taking digestive aids like proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec or H2 blockers (Zantac); both of which lower stomach acid reducing the breakdown of foods.  This also leads to partially broken-down food in our digestive system which can feed opportunistic bacteria like yeast in our gut.

In some cases, our intestines become “leaky” where broken-down food actually leaks out and this creates an immune response which can result in food sensitivities, and intolerances.  Leaky gut is one of the key causes of us becoming intolerant to histamine in food.

Managing histamine levels depends on a healthy gut, balanced microbiota, and nutrients like vitamin B6.  It has been shown that some bacteria actually produce histamine and if you have an overgrowth this will make your more histamine intolerant.

Nutrients like vitamin B6 helps us to produce the enzymes known as diamine oxidase (DAO).  DAO helps to block the absorption of too much histamine and with a reduced function of DAO, it can lead to intolerance.

Looking for another alternative to OTC meds for allergies?  Try Allerstop today!

Nutrigenomics & Histamine Intolerance

For me, my discovery of my histamine intolerance was just using a food journal and trying to connect the dots to my migraines.  After a while, I realized that the combination of red wine, pizza was sure to trigger for migraine the next day.  All foods are high in histamine even the tomato sauce.

After getting my first genomic test it became crystal clear why had such a tendency towards histamine intolerance.  I had many variants in the pathway that helps to breakdown histamine or block absorption of histamine from food.

Histamine intolerance is related to gene variants in, MTHFR, vitamin B6, HNMT, COMT, and DAO.  And, if you have a reduced function in methylation, this also can impact your metabolism of histamine.

With my genomic solutions packages, you can get tested and evaluated for as low as $499.00 including the test.  Unfortunately, the 23and Me raw data no longer tests for the important histamine variants.  Get started today with my free 15 min. Complimentary Consult to learn more.

 What if You Are Histamine Intolerant?

A good journal is the first step to determining if you an intolerance.  Record your food and symptoms.  If fermented foods or other foods high in histamine, tend to cause a delayed reaction, then you might be histamine intolerant.  Remember food intolerances are dosage-dependent – it might take a whole day of eating high histamine foods before you get a reaction.

Still can’t seem to get to the underlying cause of your allergy symptoms?  Then start with a food sensitivities test – now offering stand-alone blood spot tests for as low as $249.00 through Vibrant America.  Eliminate those foods and see if the symptom subsides after at least 30 days

 

How Well Will You Survive COVID-19?

How Well Will You Survive COVID-19?

How Well Will You Survive COVID-19?

Top experts are predicting that 40-60% of Americans will get the coronavirus.  Other experts are saying this number could be as high as 80% by the end of 2020.  So, the question really is not whether you are going to get the virus but how well you will survive and overcome this infection.    

We know that people who are over the age of 80 will be the hardest hit and will most likely require advanced medical treatment.  But why has the disease killed younger Americans, for instance – a 34-year-old California man who had asthma who recently died from this virus.  

Looking at what occurred in China and the United States the death rate from the coronavirus was the highest with those who had underlying conditions.  For China it was the death rate was highest with those with cardiovascular disease; for the US it was renal (kidney) disease.  

Following closely behind were people who had diabetes, chronic lung disease and immunocompromised were more likely to not survive this virus.

Interestingly enough obesity is highly linked to these chronic diseases.  This would make countries with high rates of diabetes and obesity like the US more risk for those contracting this virus to end up in ICU or death. 

Why are people with these conditions are more likely to suffer adverse outcome?

First of all, people who are overweight, diabetic and those that have cardiovascular disease have immune systems that are more challenged.  For instance, it is a known fact that those with diabetes have a harder time battling infections.  

In addition, those struggling with these chronic conditions are almost always struggling with oxidative stress and inflammation.  Oxidative stress is where the body does not have enough antioxidants on board to eliminate toxic substances known as reactive oxygen species.  With oxidative stress, our immune system is constantly being challenged creating an environment that makes us more vulnerable to infection.  

With an immune system that is constantly trying to reduce inflammation and fight infection, it is more likely to experience what is referred to as the “cytokine storm”.  This is where our bodies overproduce immune “messengers” in an attempt to fight off infection.  

How Does the Body Fight Viral Infections?

The first step in fighting virus infections is a direct action against the virus itself.  This can be done with a healthy diet rich in vegetables, fruits, herbs like parsley. In addition, herbs like elderberry and astragalus have antiviral properties and have been used for years to help fight viral infections like the common cold.

Once the virus enters our system, its first task at hand is to enter our cells and start replicating itself.  They actually hijack our cells and in the case of the coronavirus, its preferred cells are those that have cell receptors for the enzyme ACE2.  This is an enzyme that plays a major role in managing our blood pressure. ACE2 can also be found in high amounts in our lungs, kidney, liver and the gastrointestinal tract (GI).  

Immune support is also needed not to just boost the immune system to make sure it is in harmony or balance.  A “boosted” immune may lead to the cytokine storm or promote excessive inflammation. It is the balance of the immune system that is vital to surviving this infection.  Well, to be honest, all infections and for those struggling with autoimmune conditions.

Whole-body support brings the best weapon against the COVID-19 virus.  Even though these are stressful times as we spend our time in isolation, it is a time for reflection.  Without adequate sleep, stress reduction, physical exercise and a balanced diet, you will lose the battle right from the start.  

The 4 Key Components To Fighting Viruses

  • AntiViral – Zinc, Selenium, Iodine, Elderberry, Astragalus 
  • Anti Replication – Folate, Betaine, Polyphenols, Selenium, Zinc, NAC
  • Immune Nutrition – Low Carbohydrate Diet, Adequate Protein, Zinc, Vitamin D3, & Vitamin A
  • Whole Body Support – Adequate Sleep, Reduce Stress, Physical Exercise

 

 

What About Genomics and COVID-19

Research is coming out daily on just how does this virus works and what role does our genomics/genetics play in this battle.  This helps us to answer the question as why do some people get this virus and have few symptoms. While others end up in ICU.

It also helps to answer why people with underlying conditions like heart disease and lung conditions tend to end up in ICU.  And, why some will end up with permanent damage to their lungs.

What Genomic Variants Will Have An Impact?

There are now genomic variants or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been linked to how well you will win this battle if you were to get COVID-19.  Some are extremely complicated while others relate highly to nutrition and lifestyle.

Most of these variances or SNP’s relate to how well our body is able to fight the virus from replicating.  They are also related to how well our bodies manage inflammation and can keep our immune system in harmony.

Relevant SNP’s to the COVID-19

 

ACE2

People who have variants in ACE2 tend to have higher blood pressure and sensitivity to salt.  With this variant, one would produce less of this enzyme and therefore reduced cell receptors.  This technically means that the virus would have less of a chance to “dock” and invade the cell.

But the jury is still out on this one.

Most of the underlying conditions like heart disease and diabetes usually come with high blood pressure.  So, to support this variant, it is recommended to stick with a lower salt diet and make sure you manage your blood pressure.

Bioactives Support COVID 19

Does Melatonin Help?

Melatonin, a neurotransmitter produced by the body, can address variants in NLRP3, a compound that promotes inflammation to help fight infection.  We produce melatonin mostly while we sleep.

As we age, however, we produce less and less melatonin, so it is crucial especially for people older than 60 to get adequate sleep.  Dietary supplementation is not a bad idea especially if you are older than 60 years old.

The production of melatonin is also impacted by our body’s ability to methylate which depends on folate, vitamins B12, B2, and betaine.  If you SNP’s in this pathway, this may impact your ability to produce melatonin.

Nitric Oxide & Vitamin C

The enzyme known as NOS helps to produce nitric oxide which is known to inhibit the replication of this virus.  It is also responsible for managing blood pressure.

In order to produce nitric oxide, vitamin C is needed as a co-factor.  What if you SNP’s in vitamin C and NOS most notably, NOS3 or eNOS? Your production of nitric oxide would be limited, reducing your ability to fight off COVID-19.

Fermented Foods Sour Cream Sauerkraut

Will Fermented Foods Help?

Fermented foods and foods high in probiotics are crucial to our immune system and the health of our GI system.  But for those with variants in FUT2, it is even more important that they maintain a diet high in complex carbohydrates and fermented foods.

What does FUT2 do?  It helps us to metabolize and absorb vitamin B12 crucial for the methylation pathway.  And, for those who have this variant along with MTHFR, it is even more important to maintain a diet rich in probiotics and prebiotics.

Not only do probiotics and prebiotics support FUT2 but they also support another variant known as NOD2.  NOD2 plays a crucial role in our immune system by recognizing bacteria and viruses, stimulating our immune system.  In addition to probiotics, organic bone broth will support this variant.

Powerful Antioxidants Our Body Produces

To fight off this virus and protect our DNA, we need powerful antioxidants like superoxide dismutase (SOD3).  This enzyme is highly dependent on zinc and copper and for those with a variant in SOD3, it is very important for them to consume foods high in zinc.  It is estimated that 30% of the world’s population is deficient in this nutrient especially for a society that consumes a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Foods high in zinc are oysters, red meat, eggs, yogurt, and cashews.  If you choose to supplement, do not go over 30-50 grams without sufficient copper.  I like to recommend that with supplementation, to increase foods high in copper like dark chocolate, sesame seeds, spirulina.

 

What is a COVID-19 Genomic Report

These are just a few of variants that are known to play a role in how well your body will fight COVID-19.  Our immune system is truly complex and the more we learn about how our genomics plays a role in our immune system, the more we can tailor a nutrition and lifestyle program.

Most of how the body fights infection involve a delicate balance between inflammation, fighting infection and the calming down of that infection as the body heals.  Whether you are talking about our innate or our adaptive immune system, it is all about balance. And, that depends on nutrients, bioactives and our lifestyles.

What if you could know how you target your “clinks in our genomic armor” and develop a true defense system?  That is why I am now offering two genomic packages at a great value.

**Disclaimer – This advice is not to take the place of your healthcare professional.  Please make sure that if you are having symptoms to contact your doctor immediately.  Be Safe, Be Healthy

 

Book Your 23andMe/Ancestry Package Today!

Only $249.00

Includes COVID Report

 

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